Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendment of 1989

As required by the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, university standards of student conduct prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students on university property or as part of any university activity. Not withstanding other penalties provided by local, state and federal law which prohibit the above activity, under Title V, California Code of Regulations, 41301-41304, university disciplinary sanctions which may be imposed are expulsion, suspension, probation, or lesser sanctions. Studies on the effects of controlled substances have demonstrated that the use of such substances can lead to:

  • addiction
  • lung damage
  • heart damage
  • brain damage
  • unpredictable behavior
  • paranoia
  • other physical and mental disorders

The Counseling Center, located in the Student Health Center, can assist students in locating available drug or alcohol counseling, treatment, or rehabilitation or re-entry programs.

The Higher Education Act further provides that a student can regain eligibility, regardless of the number or type of convictions on the student's record, by successfully completing a drug rehabilitation program that complies with criteria established by the Secretary of Education and that includes two unannounced drug tests.Copies of the complete regulation and further information are available at the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarships in University Hall, Room 150.

Federal Financial Aid Regulations Pertaining To Students Who Have Been Convicted Of Possession Of A Controlled Substance, Or Who Have Been Convicted OF The Sale Of A Controlled Substance.

Effective July 1, 2000 the Secretary of Education proposes to add Sec. 668.40 (a) and (b) to implement statutory provisions to deny financial aid to students convicted of sale or possession of a controlled substance.The Periods of ineligibility, which begin as of the date of conviction, are:

  • If convicted for the first time of an offense involving the possession of a controlled substance, the ineligibility period is one year.
  • If convicted for the second time of an offense involving the possession of a controlled substance, the ineligibility period is for two years.
  • If convicted for the third time of an offense involving the possession of a controlled substance, the ineligibility period is for one year.
  • If convicted for the first time of an offense involving the sale of a controlled substance, the ineligibility period is for one year.
  • If convicted for the second time of an offense involving the sale of a controlled substance, the ineligibility period is indefinite.

Note that for purposes of determining a student's eligibility for Title IV assistance, a conviction means a conviction that is on a student's record at the time the student's eligibility for financial aid is being determined. Therefore, a conviction that was reversed, set aside, or removed from the student's record is not relevant.